Cambridge Financial English Blended Course

‘The Cambridge Financial English Blended Learning Course is a great way to develop your financial English language skills and prepare for the Cambridge English:Financial (ICFE) exam.’  Cambridge Financial English Blended Learning Course Information taken from www.cambridgeenglish.org “Cambridge Financial English has thoroughly compiled topics; the information is presented from several angles and is easy to use. The ‘online’ element is very attractive – as it gives an opportunity to study at any time and receive the tutor’s support.” Baranchuk Oxana Head of Administration and Financial Department of the representative office of Sumitomo Corporation “We’ve been exploring the programme and we think it is really modern, well organised and very well designed. All the material available is of great help to our exam preparation and we are really excited about having this opportunity to feel closer to other students from all over the world.” Laura Canobra, Natalia Moreno, Magdalena Garat and Italo Elola KPMG Advisory Services Who is the Cambridge Financial English course for? The course is for people whose first language is not English and who need to use financial English in order to perform effectively in business situations. You may be a: candidate preparing for Cambridge English: Financial finance and accountancy professional who wants to practise and improve existing English language skills in the context of your day-to-day work finance student who is keen to improve your ability to communicate in and understand financial English. Why should your company choose Cambridge Financial English? Offering Cambridge Financial English can help your organisation: attract and retain talented finance and accountancy trainees and professionals improve employees’ ability to conduct business internationally or...

Motivation vs Habit In Language Learning

‘If you wanted to run a marathon. Would you train 3-4 hours once or twice a week or would you run 30-60 minutes every day?” Motivation is a great power that drives you to do great things. It pushes you through difficulties and barriers and gives you just enough energy to achieve your goals. It’s motivation that made you think that you might need to learn a foreign language, whether you need it for your work, travelling, personal relationship or for your own interest. It doesn’t really matter what reasons are lying underneath your motivated spirit. I often feel that I can get motivated very easily and have enough energy to work on a new project for a day or two, maybe for a week. And then it starts evaporating… I get lazy, or tired or I have a great deal of other urgent stuff going on and I tend to leave my dreams and targets aside. My newest passion is French. I really love this poetic language and I’ve been trying to learn it for more than two years. I believe everybody knows how it starts: I attended a beginner French course at French Institute, I couldn’t complete it because of many business trips I had in that period. Then I decided to somehow continue my studies with my classmate form the course. And so we used to go to the park and speak French until we didn’t know the pronunciation of one of the words. Then we would switch to our language and usual chit chat about this and that. And then I had a lot of...

7 Effective Ways to Build Your Vocabulary

           I’m a language learner myself. I’m learning French and improving my Italian. Sometimes I’m extremely motivated, sometimes not, but I promise to write about motivation in learning a language in my next post. This time I’d like to offer my advice on a very sensitive issue of learning new vocabulary, more and more of new wonderful words. Most of my students want to learn new words easily and fast (me too!!!). I’m not sure I could help you with that, however I’ll try to give you some tips on how to enhance your vocabulary of any language you are studying at the moment. So here are the 7  Effective Ways that Help to Build Your Vocabulary: 1. Listen. Anywhere and anything. Radio news, TV shows, films, cartoons, YouTube videos, songs, pod-casts etc. Let technology help you in this. Take your iPod, iPad or whatever smart gadget you have and expose yourself to the language. If you’re a beginner start with cartoons and children’s stories. Then continue with your favourite songs (find out the lyrics to help you). In this way, not only will you learn to guess the words’ meanings from the context, but you will also learn their pronunciation, grammatical patterns and collocations. 2. Read. Anywhere and anything. Lower level students can read graded readers or short stories for children. You can also read the instructions or descriptions of various products e.g. the label of your shower gel or the ingredients of your favourite English/French/Swedish biscuits (depends on your target language, of course). Read newspapers and magazines, books, brochures anything written in the...
What can you say about Duomo?

What can you say about Duomo?

                                                                                        (“Tramonto tra le guglie” by P.Gabriele) I adore climbing up from the underground station ‘Duomo’ and seeing the cathedral appear in front of my eyes with all its beauty and magnificence. There aren’t so many man made objects that would fascinate me every single time I see them. Duomo di Milano is one of them. Maybe it’s because it represents the whole world – from the smallest animals to angels and demons, or because it’s so carefully designed and decorated, or because it’s a cathedral that means so much to Milan. I’m sure every Milanese brings the city guests and visitors to see Duomo from outside, then inside and finally from the roof. I personally believe, that every Milanese could perfectly describe Duomo using quite sophisticated Gothic architecture terms in Italian. However, the ones who have foreign visitors or friends might struggle a bit. So here you are, a short glossary for Gothic cathedral terms. Apse (abside) – the semicircular or polygonal termination to the choir or aisles of a church. Arcade (arcata) – an arch or a series of arches supported by piers or columns Arch (arco)- the pointed arch is widely regarded as the main identifiable feature of Gothic architecture (distinct from the round arch of the Romanesque period). The most common Gothic arches are the Lancet, Equilateral and Ogee. Buttress (contrafforte) –...
Perfect Time for Christmas Stories

Perfect Time for Christmas Stories

When the temperature is getting somewhere very close to zero or below, people are impatiently shopping for Christmas gifts and Christmas lights are shining all over the city the only wish I have is to make a huge mug of winter tea and re-read some of my favourite Christmas stories. Even though most of my favourite stories were originally written for children, I truly believe every grown-up can find some very important lessons and insights in them. It’s just a perfect time for Christmas stories to be read once again… My favourite ones: 1. The Little Match Girl by Hans Christian Anderson On a cold New Year’s Eve, a poor girl tries to sell matches in the street. She is freezing badly, but she is afraid to go home because her father will beat her for not selling any matches. She takes shelter in a nook and lights the matches to warm herself.  You can read the whole story here. 2. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens The tale begins on a “cold, bleak, biting” Christmas Eve exactly seven years after the death of Ebenezer Scrooge’s business partner, Jacob Marley. Scrooge is established within the first stave as “a squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scraping, clutching, covetous, old sinner!” who has no place in his life for kindness, compassion, charity or benevolence. Returning home one evening, Scrooge is visited by Marley’s ghost. Marley warns Scrooge to change his ways lest he undergo the same miserable afterlife as himself. Scrooge is then visited by three additional ghosts – each in its turn, and each visit detailed in a separate stave – who accompany him...

False Friends: a Must-Learn List

Illustration from hypebeast.com When I first started to study Italian I was amazed by the number of words I already knew or could very easily guess the meanings. Partly because some of them are similar to Latin (I had studied some Latin at university) but mainly because they are not so different from English words. I remember how happy I was when I was speaking with my Italian friends using beginner’s sentence structures and from time to time throwing in some really fancy advanced level words. What can be simpler than taking a Latin origin English word, putting an Italian sounding ending (-a, -o, -e, -i), adding an article (even if sometimes it’s difficult to decide upon the gender) and using an Italian-like pronunciation? Indipendent becomes indipendente, liberty becomes liberta’ and you can continue like this for ages! Thanks God for inventing Latin! However, trusting this strategy 100% may be dangerous or at least embarrassing. Languages just like living organisms are continuously developing and changing, the words alter their meanings, acquire the new ones, forget the old ones. Obviously in the course of time some significant shifts and changes in meanings happened in both, English and Italian. There are words that look the same, sound almost the same BUT they mean different things. They are called False Friends (Falsi Amici) and they should be included in every student’s ‘a MUST-LEARN’ list 🙂 I add a list of the most common English-Italian false friends and their translations which should be helpful not only for those who study English but also for the English speakers who wish to learn Italian. English...